Borders, Boundaries, and Beyond

‘Borders, Boundaries, and Beyond in the Long Eighteenth-Century’ is an upcoming one-day interdisciplinary conference taking place at the University of Sheffield on 21 April 2017. The conference has been very generously funded by White Rose College of the Arts and Humanities, BSECS, and University of Sheffield Arts & Humanities Post Graduate Research Forum.

***Registration now open***
Please follow this link to register: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/borders-boundaries-and-beyond-in-the-long-eighteenth-century-tickets-32251509132

**Keynote speaker**
We are pleased to announce that our keynote address will be given by Dr Adam Rounce, University of Nottingham.

Adam Rounce is Associate Professor in English Literature at the Universty of Nottingham. His main ongoing research involvement is with the Cambridge edition of the Complete Works of Jonathan Swift, for which he is co-editing two volumes (of Irish writings, and personal writings), and contributing an accompanying Chronology as a reference work. He has also published extensively on poetry and literary criticism in the ‘long’ eighteenth century, from Dryden and Johnson to Joseph Warton, William Cowper, Charles Churchill, and Mark Akenside. Dr Rounce has recently published a book about literary failure, concerning the unsuccessful careers of writers that were known to Samuel Johnson.

As well as his editorial work on Swift, Dr Rounce is currently writing a book about the history of the English literary edition from 1660 to 1800, and the emergence of a style of editing and annotation. He is also working on related pieces concerning the poetic canon, taste, and the culture of anthologies and commonplace books.

Previously, Dr Rounce taught at Bristol, Keele and Manchester Metropolitan universities. He has been involved in broadcasts for Radio 4 and is an associate editor of the Cambridge Works of Jonathan Swift, and the Wiley Encyclopaedia of British Literature, 1660-1789, and is on the editorial board of the John Clare Society Journal. Since 2009, he has been a consultant to the Digital Miscellanies Index, at the University of Oxford.

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